The Syntax of Time

The Syntax of Time: The Phenomenology of Time in Greek Physics and Speculative Logic from Iamblichus to Anaximander

 (Studies in Platonism, Neoplatonism, and the Platonic Tradition #2)

 

by Peter Manchester, 2005

 

The fourth century Neoplatonist Iamblichus, interpreting Plotinus on the topic of time, incorporates a ‘diagram of time’ that bears comparison to the figure of double continuity drawn by Husserl in his studies of time. Using that comparison as a bridge, this book seeks a phenomenological recovery of Greek thought about time. It argues that the feature of motion that the word ‘time’ designates in Greek differs from what most modern scholarship has assumed, that the very phenomenon of time has been misidentified for centuries. This leads to corrective readings of Plotinus, Aristotle, Parmenides, and Heraclitus, all looking back to the final phrase of the fragment of Anaximander, from which this volume takes its title: “according to the syntax of time.”

(Text by the organizer)

 

CONTENTS

 

Preface and Acknowledgments

Chapter One – Two-Dimensional Time in Husserl and Iamblichus

The Problem of the Flowing of Time

The Flux of Consciousness

The Transparency of the Flux

Time-Framing in Locke and Hume

The Dimensions of Transparency

Two-Dimensional Time in Husserl

The Figure of Double Continuity

The Double Intentionality of Disclosure Space

Two-Dimensional Time in Iamblichus

Time as the Sphere of the All

 

Chapter Two – Time and the Soul in Plotinus

Two-Dimensional Time in Neoplatonism

The Schema of Participation

The Silence of Time in Plotinus

 

Chapter Three – Everywhere Now: Physical Time in Aristotle

Soul and the Surface of Exoteric Time

The Spanning of Motion

The Scaling of Spans

The Unit of Disclosure Space

The Soul of Physical Time

 

Chapter Four – Parmenides: Time as the Now

Parmenides Thinks about Time

Signpost 1: Being Ungenerated and Unperishing

Signpost 2: Whole; Signpost 4: The Coherent One

Signpost 3: Now is All at Once and Entirely Total

Conclusion

 

Chapter Five – Heraclitus and the Need for Time

Review: The Path to Heraclitus

From Husserl to Heraclitus via Iamblichus

Time in Heraclitus: The Circular Joining of ἀεὶ and αἰών

Heraclitus as a Gloss on Anaximander

 

Appendix 1 – Physical Lectures on Time by Aristotle: A MinimalTranslation

Appendix 2 – Fragment 8 of the Poem of Parmenides: Text and Translation

Bibliography

Index


Vous aimerez aussi...

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.